Archive for February, 2011

Access to JAWRA Articles

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

“How can I get the full text of a JAWRA article?” This question comes up from time to time, so I thought I’d review our policies here.

When you access the Wiley Online Library, you will see an open lock next to titles you may read online. Wiley-Blackwell typically makes the February issue’s articles temporarily available for marketing purposes. Some authors opt to pay for “Online Open,”   which makes their articles permanently available to everyone. Availability of other articles depends upon your personal and organizational access.

The best way to gain access is to become an AWRA member. (Discount memberships are available to students and those in developing nations.) You get online access to everything, including all the JAWRA archives, plus many other benefits, and you help a very worthy organization. Great deal! Once a member logs in to the AWRA website, a special link on the “Things You Can Do” page takes them to the Wiley Online Library, where all the locks will show “open.”

Another popular way to access JAWRA is through a library subscription managed through your school or agency. If you are working on your institutions’s computer network, the Wiley Online Library recognizes your IP address, and opens the locks. Subscriptions are a budget issue for libraries. So, if you and your colleagues use JAWRA a lot, make sure your librarian knows!

If you still do not have access, you may purchase access to individual articles with a credit card. Some libraries have arrangements to purchase access for their patrons: see your librarian.

Finally, JAWRA authors are allowed to send their colleagues PDF’s of their own articles. (They are not, however, allowed to post them on websites.) On the abstract page, click the Author Information link for an email address, and write the corresponding author to request a copy. Most will be happy to oblige, though this is entirely at their option.

AE Caruso safe in Christchurch

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Seeing the terrible earthquake damage on CNN, Susan and I emailed Associate Editor Brian Caruso. He replied, “I’m ok although I won’t be able to get into the university for a while (maybe a week or 2) so my editorial responsibilities may have to be on hold.  I’ll keep you posted.”

I thought I’d post his message here for others concerned about Brian’s safety.

Wanted: AE for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computing

Monday, February 21st, 2011

JAWRA Associate Editors (AE’s) serve as primary advisors to the JAWRA Editor. Responsibilities fall into two areas: reviews and subject development. The Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computing position handles between 5 and 15 papers per year. All manuscripts are handled through our ScholarOne Manuscripts™ system, with the AE selecting reviewers and, when reviews return, making a recommendation to the Editor. AE’s are encouraged to seek out qualified authors in their subject areas and encourage them to submit papers to JAWRA. These could be individual submittals or as featured collections of related papers organized around an introduction.

Although JAWRA publishes papers in all areas of artificial intelligence and advanced computing, we have particular interest in using Artificial Intelligence for model parameterization.

Associate editorship is a volunteer position earning our heartfelt thanks and an invitation to our annual AE luncheon. It also offers the opportunity to make a difference on the cutting edge of multidisciplinary water resources. The term of an AE is three years, but may be extended by mutual agreement.

Interested individuals should email the Editor at editor@awra.org. We are happy to answer any questions. We will hold this position open at a minimum until March 16, 2011, but early application is encouraged.

Associate Editor Soon-Thiam Khu is leaving

Saturday, February 19th, 2011

Soon-Thiam Khu, JAWRA Associate Editor for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computing, has resigned his position due to unforeseen personal family circumstances which require his presence in Malaysia. Having just gone through my daughter’s health scare (in New York, not halfway around the world!) I fully understand how trying family circumstances can be. I’m sure we all wish the best for Soon-Thiam and his family.

An announcement for the position will be coming soon.

Regulatory skill still needed

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

February 2011 Article:Economic and Ecological Rules for Water Quality Trading,” by Richard D. Hora and  James S. Shortle. Part of Featured Collection on Water-Quality Trading.

If you think pollution trading is simple and requires little regulatory skill, you need to read this article.

This paper explores how features of water quality problems affect the design of markets for water pollution control relative to textbook emissions markets. Three fundamental design tasks that regulators must address for pollution trading to achieve an environmental goal at low cost are examined: (1) defining the point and nonpoint commodities to be traded, (2) defining rules governing commodity exchange, and (3) setting caps on the commodity supplies so as to achieve an environmental target.

The authors identify a fundamental barrier to designing water quality markets that trade estimated emissions to improve the efficiency of pollution control allocations across sources. That barrier is the potentially high regulatory costs associated with the regulator’s need to know polluters’ abatement costs in order to design markets that can improve the efficiency of achieving environmental outcomes. Somewhat ironically, the information needed is no different from the information needed for efficient technology-based emissions (or estimated emission) limits.

The lesson: “Gains will only materialize in water quality settings if the regulatory choices are made appropriately. … Both economic and ecological information is required, and the choices should be made based on a sound conceptual framework that properly integrates this information.” There’s no easy substitute for knowing what you’re doing!

[Please note: I have quoted and paraphrased freely from the article, but the interpretation is my own!]

Wanted: AE for Aquatic Ecology

Friday, February 11th, 2011

JAWRA Associate Editors (AE’s) serve as primary advisors to the JAWRA Editor. Responsibilities fall into two areas: reviews and subject development. The Aquatic Ecology position handles between 5 and 15 papers per year. All manuscripts are handled through our ScholarOne Manuscripts™ system, with the AE selecting reviewers and, when reviews return, making a recommendation to the Editor. AE’s are encouraged to seek out qualified authors in their subject areas and encourage them to submit papers to JAWRA. These could be individual submittals or as featured collections of related papers organized around an introduction.

Although JAWRA publishes papers in all areas of aquatic ecology, we would particularly like to develop more submissions in the following areas:

  • Stream restoration effects
  • Biological indicators
  • Dam removal effects
  • In-stream flow requirements

Associate editorship is a volunteer position earning our heartfelt thanks and an invitation to our annual AE luncheon. It also offers the opportunity to make a difference on the cutting edge of multidisciplinary water resources. The term of an AE is three years, but may be extended by mutual agreement.

Interested individuals should email the Editor at editor@awra.org. We are happy to answer any questions. We will hold this position open at a minimum until March 7, 2011, but early application is encouraged.

Non-conventional trading

Friday, February 11th, 2011

February 2011 Article:Optimal Pollution Trading Without Pollution Reductions: A Note,” by Jorge H. García, Matthew T. Heberling, and Hale W. Thurston. Part of Featured Collection on Water-Quality Trading.

Huh? No pollution reduction? Well, actually, there is a time shift and a smoothing involved.

This paper introduces a model of water quality trading between a farm, sometimes referred here as a pulse-pollution source, and a firm, a more steady or constant source of pollution. The farm may supply pollution credits to the firm through constructing, restoring, or enhancing wetlands. The object of exchange is the temporary retention of pollution (i.e. lower peak loadings) as opposed to traditional pollution reductions.

Got it? The actual computation of trade-offs using economic theories can get rather complicated, the authors show it is possible. The lesson here is, trade-offs do not always have to take a conventional form.

[Please note: I have quoted and paraphrased freely from the article, but the interpretation is my own!]

Associate Editor Reuben Goforth is leaving

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

Reuben R. Goforth, JAWRA Associate Editor for Aquatic Ecology, is stepping down. Following the advice of his tenure committee, he needs more time to focus on publishing his own articles. I’m sure many of you can relate to that!

He writes, “I do appreciate the opportunity to serve as an associate editor for JAWRA, and perhaps there will be another opportunity for me to do so again in the future once the tenure hurdle is behind me. … I wish you and your staff, particularly Susan Scalia, the very best!”

Reuben has served since 2008, and we have appreciated the dedication and skill he brings to the job. Reuben, we wish you the best in your tenure quest, and hope your tenure committee regards you as highly as we do!

Reuben has generously offered to continue handling his current manuscript assignments. We will be announcing an opening soon.

Sociopolitical Conditions for Trading

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

February 2011 Article: “Sociopolitical Conditions for Successful Water Quality Trading in the South Nation River Watershed, Ontario, Canada,” by Dennis O’Grady. Part of Featured Collection on Water-Quality Trading.

This is a comprehensive evaluation of a trading program in Canada. What struck me here is the complex set of interactions among the participants.

A successful trading program requires several conditions, including community agreement, legislative backing, credit and cost certainty, simplified delivery and verification, written instru- ments, and legal liability protection. South Nation Conservation (SNC), a community-based watershed organization, is the broker handling the transactions for these P credits. The program is run by a multi-stakeholder committee, and all project field visits are done by farmers and not paid professionals.

Even though large sums were spent on NPS control, the total amount of funding spent to reduce P loadings was substantially smaller than if the wastewater plants themselves had to control this same amount of loading. One important aspect of trading often overlooked is the income redistribution from urban to rural communities.

[Please note: I have quoted and paraphrased freely from the article, but the interpretation is my own!]

Thermal trading

Monday, February 7th, 2011

February 2011 Article:A Watershed Approach to Improve Water Quality: Case Study of Clean Water Services’ Tualatin River Program,” by Bobby Cochran and Charles Logue. Part of Featured Collection on Water-Quality Trading.

This seemed a nice example of trading in that it applied to a single watershed where the benefits and costs were relatively easy to compute.

Clean Water Services (CWS) is a special-purpose district utility in Washington County, Oregon, that provides wastewater collection and treatment and stormwater management services to over 500,000 residents. The CWS faced a limit on the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for temperature in discharged effluent. The trade-off, rather than chilling the discharge, is to restore shading to the Tualatin River itself.

The study compared the Tualatin program with some of the common cited factors for successful market-based programs. The program had supportive geography, pre-existing capacity to implement trading, supportive stakeholders, regulatory agency support, and a history of developing watershed plans to guide successful implementation. The economics also worked in the Tualatin program’s favor. The wide gap between constructing mechanical refrigeration units and planting trees compensated for some uncertainty in pollution reduction costs through trading and higher transaction costs initially. Trusted relationships in the Tualatin translated into a permit that simplified the process of trading, making it easy to measure the progress and compliance and communicate that to others.

[Please note: I have quoted and paraphrased freely from the article, but the interpretation is my own!]