Archive for January, 2014

Associate Editor, Forest Hydrology

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

JAWRA is looking for an Associate Editor for Forest Hydrology. This particular position would focus on evaluating articles about the interactions of forests and water resources. Many papers in this field have important implications for national and international policies.

JAWRA Associate Editors (AEs) serve as primary advisors to the JAWRA Editor. Responsibilities fall into two areas: reviews and subject development. The AE for Forest Hydrology handles 5 to 15 papers per year. All manuscripts are processed through our ScholarOne Manuscripts™system, with the AE selecting reviewers and, when reviews return, making a recommendation to the Editor. AE’s are encouraged to seek out qualified authors in their subject areas and encourage them to submit papers to JAWRA. These could be individual submittals or as featured collections of related papers organized around an introduction.

Associate editorship is a volunteer position earning our heartfelt thanks and an invitation to our annual AE luncheon. It also offers the opportunity to make a difference on the cutting edge of multidisciplinary water resources. Many AE’s have found the experience of making decisions on manuscripts helpful in sharpening their own professional writing skills. The term of an AE is three years, but may be extended by mutual agreement. Interested individuals should email their CV to the Editor at editor@awra.org. We are happy to answer any questions. We will hold this position open at a minimum until Friday, March 14, 2014.

Ge Sun is leaving

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014
I am sorry to announce the Ge Sun will step down as Associate Editor for Forest Hydrology as soon as we can find a replacement. Ge has done a great job since 2008. He lead the way with our Chinese Forest Hydrology featured collection, and will continue to work on the Water and Megacities collection based on our recent Bejing conference.
Please join me in thanking Ge for a job well done! An opening for this position will be announced shortly.

JAWRA Associate Editor, Water Quality Monitoring

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

JAWRA is looking for an Associate Editor for Water Quality Monitoring. This particular position would focus on evaluating articles about chemical and biological sampling efforts, looking at the temporal and spatial coverage and the statistical treatment of data. We would consider selecting two individuals for positions in this area, depending on how the candidates match, and if needed to cover the anticipated workload.

JAWRA Associate Editors (AEs) serve as primary advisors to the JAWRA Editor. Responsibilities fall into two areas: reviews and subject development. The AE for Water Quality Monitoring handles 20 to 25 papers per year, which would be divided between the two incumbents. All manuscripts are processed through our ScholarOne Manuscripts™system, with the AE selecting reviewers and, when reviews return, making a recommendation to the Editor. AE’s are encouraged to seek out qualified authors in their subject areas and encourage them to submit papers to JAWRA. These could be individual submittals or as featured collections of related papers organized around an introduction.

Associate editorship is a volunteer position earning our heartfelt thanks and an invitation to our annual AE luncheon. It also offers the opportunity to make a difference on the cutting edge of multidisciplinary water resources. Many AE’s have found the experience of making decisions on manuscripts helpful in sharpening their own professional writing skills. The term of an AE is three years, but may be extended by mutual agreement. Interested individuals should email their CV to the Editor at editor@awra.org. We are happy to answer any questions. We will hold this position open at a minimum until Tuesday, February 11, 2014.

1964

Wednesday, January 1st, 2014

AWRA celebrates its golden anniversary in 2014. What was the world like fifty years ago?

The US population was 192 million (vs. 314 today). Ford introduced the Mustang, which cost about $2,400. There were no mileage stickers, but who cared, when you could fill up that baby for 30 cents per gallon? No wonder Lyndon Johnson swept to reelection over Barry Goldwater in November!

In popular culture, Elizabeth Taylor married Richard Burton — for the first time. The Gilligan’s Island series began its fabled run (“a three hour cruise”). The Beatles released “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Muhammad Ali defeated Sonny Liston to become World Heavyweight Champ. There was no Super Bowl yet, but the Boston Celtics were the NBA champions and the St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series

The Soviet Union and “Red China” were our mortal enemies, the communist menace. In August, fearful of allies falling like dominoes, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution, effectively declaring the Viet Nam War. When in Washington, D.C, please visit the memorial to 58,195 brave Americans who would give their lives.

On a more positive note, the Civil Rights Act became law, and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. won the Nobel Peace Prize. Typical of the times, nearly all AWRA charter members were white males. Many engineering schools, even those accepting all races, still did not admit women. When you go to an AWRA conference this year, look around at the wonderful diversity; such a meeting would have been almost impossible in the segregated South of 1964.

IBM introduced the System/360 computer in 1964, the first with a true operating system. You programmed it with 80-character punch cards, carrying your boxes of cards to the “computer room,” where operators accepted your offering and, eventually, gave you back a printout. Engineers and scientists did routine calculations on slide rules; there were no pocket calculators. Most phones had dials, all were tethered to cords, and “Ma Bell” owned every one of them.

Flying in the new Boeing 727, introduced the year before, was fun, an upscale activity. Many travelers wore a jacket and tie onto the airplane. No problem getting through security: there wasn’t any. In flight, a pretty stewardess served you a meal on real china.

The environmental movement was in its infancy: Silent Spring had only been published in 1962. The Wilderness Act was signed in 1964. The Surgeon General declared smoking hazardous to one’s health, but the Marlboro Man remained the image of manly ruggedness, and people still smoked almost everywhere. Yet over the horizon were: the Cuyahoga River fire (1969), NEPA (1969), EPA (1970), and the Clean Water Act (1972).

This was a time for starting journals. Some other journals that started in this period include: ASCE Journal of Sanitary Engineering (1956), Journal of Hydrology (1963), and Water Resources Research (1965).

In preparing a journal paper, you wrote your first draft in cursive on a pad of paper. Then a “secretary” – remember them? – typed it. Minor corrections were made with a gooey substance called “whiteout.” If you were lucky enough to have your paper accepted, the journal sent you a template on which you glued “camera-ready copy.”

Water Resources Bulletin, Volume 1, published in 1965, wasn’t much to look at, mostly a newsletter. (Hydata would later serve this purpose.) The first original technical paper, “Water Dynamics in the Soil-Plant Ecosystem,” by M. B. Russell, was published in 1966 under our first Editor, Randy Boggess. Three more original papers were published that year. Today, I am the eleventh in a distinguished line of Editors, and JAWRA publishes about 115 papers annually.